Three Generations of Family History

Below are some family history questions to consider before we work together. You don’t need to write anything down or send anything in advance. You may need to do a little research, however, by asking your parents or other family members. Don’t worry if there are answers you can’t get. What you already know will be enough.

  • Who died early?
  • Who left?
  • Who was abandoned, isolated, or excluded from the family?
  • Who was adopted or who chose adoption for their child?
  • Who died in childbirth?
  • Who had a stillbirth, miscarriage, or abortion?
  • Who died by suicide?
  • Who committed a serious crime?
  • Who experienced a significant trauma or suffered a catastrophic event?
  • Who lost their home or possessions and had difficulty recovering?
  • Who suffered in war?
  • Who died in or participated in the Holocaust or some other genocide?
  • Who was enslaved or owned slaves?
  • Who was murdered?
  • Who murdered someone or felt responsible for someone’s death or misfortune?
  • Who hurt, cheated, or took advantage of someone?
  • Who profited from another’s loss?
  • Who was wrongly accused?
  • Who was jailed or institutionalized?
  • Who had a physical, emotional, or mental disability?
  • Which parent or grandparent had a significant relationship prior to getting married, and what happened?
  • Was someone deeply hurt by another?
  • Did something traumatic happen while your mother was pregnant with you?
  • Was she highly anxious, depressed, or stressed?
  • Were your parents having difficulties in their relationship during the pregnancy? (Unsure they’d stay together? Violence? Arguing? Separating? Drinking? Cheating?)
  • Did you experience a difficult birth? Were you born premature? Forceps?
  • Did your mother experience postpartum depression?
  • Were you separated from your mother after birth?
  • Were you adopted?
  • Did you experience a trauma or a separation from your mother during your childhood or infancy?
  • Did your parents go on a vacation when you were young?
  • Were you sent away to visit relatives or grandparents?
  • Were you or your mother ever hospitalized and forced to be apart (maybe you spent time in an incubator, or had your tonsils removed or some other medical procedure, or your mother needed to have surgery or experienced a complication from a pregnancy, or you were sent to stay with grandparents or other family members, etc.)?
  • Did your mother experience a trauma or emotional turmoil during your childhood or infancy (death of a parent, grandparent or sibling, a separation or divorce, alcoholic or unfaithful husband, etc.)?
  • Did your mother give away a child, or lose a child or pregnancy before or after you were born?
  • Was your mother’s attention pulled to a trauma involving one of your siblings (a late-term miscarriage, a stillbirth, a death, a medical emergency, etc.)?

As well, I’d like you to form a sentence or two about your worst fear. If your life suddenly fell apart, what’s your worst fear?  What’s the worst thing that could happen to you ? This is probably a feeling that’s been with you your whole life. The answer to this question is key.

With this question answered, you’re ready to sign up for a private session. My assistant, Kari Dunlop, will help you with scheduling. Kari’s phone number is 403.244.0455. Her email is info@markwolynn.com.

Cancellation Policy: Any appointment missed or canceled without a 24-hour notice will result in loss of payment.